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UNITED KINGDOM

ADDER

Armstrong-Siddeley

Armstrong_Siddley_Adder-02.jpg

Armstrong-Siddeley Motors was formed in 1919 when Armstrong Whitworth Development Company bought Siddeley-Deasy, which had built aircraft engines during WWI.
In 1935 Armstrong-Siddeley Motors became a subsidiary of Hawker Siddeley, which merged with the engine business of Bristol Aero Engines to become Bristol Siddeley in 1960, and then with Rolls-Royce in 1966.

The Adder was a pure jet version created in 1948 from the Armstrong Siddeley Mamba ASM3 airscrew gas-turbine by removal of the airscrew gearing. This resulting a very slender turbojet with a long air intake spinner housing the generator.

It was used to power two experimental aircraft :

  • The Swedish Saab 210
  • The Australian GAF Pika
Armstrong_Siddley_Adder-01.jpg
Armstrong-Siddeley ADDER, jet engine. Source : Flight, 15 Feb. 1951

The Adder was a pure jet version created in 1948 from the Armstrong Siddeley Mamba ASM3 airscrew gas-turbine by removal of the airscrew gearing. This resulting a very slender turbojet with a long air intake spinner housing the generator.

It was used to power two experimental aircraft :

  • The Swedish Saab 210
  • The Australian GAF Pika
Armstrong_Siddley_Adder-03.jpg

Thus, although the Adder found no commercial application, it proved to be a valuable point on the learning curve and the designers went on to develop the Viper turbojet.

Armstrong_Siddley_Adder-03.jpg